Can we provide an excellent cultural education without involving schools?

As Nigel Molesworth might have said in Back in the Jug Agane 'any fule kno' that trying to involve schools in anything but their core business of delivering the national curriculum like milkmen used to deliver the daily pinta, teaching to the test, climbing up the league tables, providing full wrap around care 247, being … Continue reading Can we provide an excellent cultural education without involving schools?

Tips for teachers: It depends how you count ’em.

“It depends how you count 'em…” has been a constant refrain through the cultural education exchange visit in Finland this week. Whether it’s golf courses in Espoo (7 or 8), municipalities in Helsinki (4 or 14) or lakes in Finland (187,888 plus or minus), it all depends on how you count them. For phenomena you … Continue reading Tips for teachers: It depends how you count ’em.

Tips for teachers: It’s the littlest things that make a difference.

We're planning an archaeological dig this weekend on Walney Island in Cumbria and are about to welcome a group of thirty year 5 children on Monday to come and see the site, get their hands dirty and begin to wrestle with the skills needed to interpret the dirty old unseen history that has been buried … Continue reading Tips for teachers: It’s the littlest things that make a difference.

Questions for teachers: what’s your Galileo moment?

Jumping out of our archive today was the "Galileo - and still it moves" project. This involved working with a group of year 5 children to explore the planets and in doing so, develop their literacy skills: particularly their speaking, listening and writing skills. We started off by exploring Galileo and what he went through … Continue reading Questions for teachers: what’s your Galileo moment?

Back to school armed with weapons of mass destruction and learnings of the third kind.

It's a new school year and memories of tests failed, repeated years and thwarted ambitions waft through the air again as the leaves start to turn, the air chills and the first signs of Christmas appear on the supermarket shelves. What did we learn from our summer break that will see us through the darkening … Continue reading Back to school armed with weapons of mass destruction and learnings of the third kind.

Calling teachers interested in educational and cultural exchange in Brazil

Over the last two years, Aspire has organised international conferences for Principals and Head teachers from Bulgaria, India, Nigeria and the UAE to visit UK schools. We have also produced student exchange programmes for students from Nigeria, Serbia and Macedonia. These events have been very powerful in establishing links between UK and overseas schools, developing … Continue reading Calling teachers interested in educational and cultural exchange in Brazil

What’s the point of school? Ask a School Ecologist.

What’s the point of school? Kids are socialites at 7, adults at 12 and doubting everything the teacher and the school stands for. Behaviour is questionable, deference is a quaint notion of a rose tinted past when teachers were head of the classroom and everyone knew and welcomed their places. Curriculum is irrelevant and has … Continue reading What’s the point of school? Ask a School Ecologist.

Aspire up the Amazon: calling teachers interested in outdoor education in the Amazon and French Guyana

Over the last few years, Aspire has been involved in adult learning programmes which have focused on outdoor and forest education. These programmes have been very powerful in establishing links between UK and overseas schools, developing educational exchanges and facilitating visits by UK based artists to partners across Europe. I will be visiting French Guyana … Continue reading Aspire up the Amazon: calling teachers interested in outdoor education in the Amazon and French Guyana

Poetry on the Hoof: Feeding frenzy (How Schools Devour Each Other)

The feeder primary school feeds the secondary school which feeds the universities or the workforce. The feeder primary school is fed by nursery schools who, in turn, are fed by child minders, nannies or parents and finally the cradle or the grave. Such is the feeding chain: Each school is fed by or feeds another. … Continue reading Poetry on the Hoof: Feeding frenzy (How Schools Devour Each Other)