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At a recent educational management conference, the presenter talked about the value of the green curriculum, stressing its importance in Eco-viability, sustainability and all good things in general.  She added, like all good humanists might do, that as we only had one life, we best make the best of it, that we only had one life on this planet and that it was our moral duty to be good guardians of it.  In an important nod to her audience however she also recognised that there was more than one way of looking at our lives on the planet: “to those of you who believe in reincarnation” she finished, ” the greening of the curriculum is not so much about saving the planet now, but making it a better place for you when you return”.

Reincarnation is a particularly handy idea to deal with common sense notions that we only have one life; that life is not a dress rehearsal; that death is a foregone conclusion and like taxes, we best face up to the giant tax collector in the sky and pay what’s due on time, with no argument and with good grace. Reincarnation allows us to plan for the second, third, fourth and who knows how many times around, hopefully securing a better deal on the next visit unless we have been particularly odoress on this occasion.

Planning for reincarnation would be a useful beaurocratic addition to funding applications as it would be a tacit acknowledgment that our cultural efforts are always flawed, no matter how many business plans we write. A box which asks us how we intend to produce the production, deliver the curriculum or save the world when we are reincarnated either a) as a lizard or b) as a superhero would make writing and reading funding applications a lot more of an entertaining process for everyone.